BATON
Cabrio
Painting
Golden
Sartre
Couture
Baton
WORKING
Monday
FACILE
Tournage
Machine
BATON
Station
FRESH
Kissing
FANTASY
Damage
Baton
WINTER
Everyday
Sacré
Yellow
Cottage
Baton
TURBO
Palais
Optical
Rolling
Albert
Versailles
Turbo
MIXTAPE
Balance
ROUTINE
Mother
Average
TURBO
Capitale
DREAM
Bourgeois
ORANGE
Mastery
Turbo
DESSERT
Always
KNIGHT
Fashion
Sublime
Turbo
Baton Turbo
A grotesque with unique style

Baton Turbo is a grotesque that combines a simple straightforward formal approach, with eccentric letter shapes inspired by french vernacular typography. We love the naive and unpretentious elegance of our previously released Baton, but the small x-height and condensed proportions make it very specific: it is essentially intended for display sizes and short texts. We wanted to adapt Baton into a versatile typeface, while maintaining as much of the original character as possible. All the design choices — the proportions, the spacing, the number of weights — have been made for Baton Turbo to work well in the various settings that modern typography, both print and digital, present.

Designed by Anton Koovit and Yassin Baggar.

All Alternates
Alternate g
Smaller Figures for Text
Upright styles: try them!
Regular
ESOTERIC SAFARI TRIP
Marvel in Wonderlands Click to edit
Book
CASABLANCA MAROC
Population: 4.2 million
Medium
KRUSHING GROOVES
Rap Battle in the Park
Bold
QUARTIERS DE PARIS
Odéon, Luxembourg
Heavy
THE SPACE SHUTTLE
5 Orbital Spacecrafts
Italic styles: try them!
Regular Italic
TOUR DE FRANCE 1993
Winner: Miguel Indurain Click to edit
Book Italic
ENTERPRISE ORBITER
Built in 1976 for testing
Medium Italic
AWESOME DISCOVERY
Mysterious Encounter
Bold Italic
PAINTING BY É. MANET
Le Déjeuner sur l’herbe
Heavy Italic
FAMOUS ART WRITER
Passion for Drawings
Text sizes
In 1874, in an effort to bestir the public, the Impressionists held an exhibition. The excitement was all they could have desired, but it led rather to obloquy than to sales. Again and again they exposed in the hope of obtaining recognition, but not until 1888 were they successful. The average spectator did not recognise nature in their canvases. The vision was an unusual one, and bore but slight resemblance to what had gone before. But gradually things underwent a change. Friends of the Impressionists launched a campaign of proselytising. Now and then a picture was sold to a collector; formerly restaurant keepers and bricklayers had been the only buyers of their work. The popular press softened its criticisms and in many instances went so far as to defend their pictures. As a result of these numerous indications of a growing approval among connoisseurs, the public, that almost immovable mass of reactionary impulses, began to look with favour on the new works it had so recently ridiculed. The great majority of people had cared only for such canvases as those in which the intellect might jump from one familiar object to another, recognising it wholly, comprehending its uses, but without giving thought to its meaning.
Baton Turbo Regular, 16px
The years from 1865 to 1876 constitute a period of Renoir’s life rich in its promise of splendid things. His keen admirations and high enthusiasms made of him throughout this time a disciple. But his achievements, small as they were, were more sumptuous and effectual than either Manet’s or Monet’s. Their true significance, though, lay in their assurance of what was to come after he had completed that unlearning process through which all great men must pass. Only by sitting at a master’s feet can one acquire the knowledge that informs which influences should be utilised and which cast aside. One cannot learn from experience the total lessons of many men, each one of whom has given a lifetime to the study of a different side of a subject. If these men are to be surpassed their life work must be used as a starting point. Renoir began thus. He had fallen under the sway of Courbet, Manet, Delacroix and Monet; but after eleven years he had exhausted his creative interest in both their theories and their attainments. These men had expressed all that was in them. For Renoir to cling to them was to stand still. If he was to go down in history as a constructive genius and not merely as an able imitator, it was time for him to strike out alone.
Baton Turbo Book, 16px, alternate g
The problem before us is how to communicate an initial force of 12,000 yards per second to a shell of 108 inches in diameter, weighing 20,000 pounds. Now when a projectile is launched into space, what happens to it? It is acted upon by three independent forces: the resistance of the air, the attraction of the earth, and the force of impulsion with which it is endowed. Let us examine these three forces. The resistance of the air is of little importance. The atmosphere of the earth does not exceed forty miles. Now, with the given rapidity, the projectile will have traversed this in five seconds, and the period is too brief for the resistance of the medium to be regarded otherwise than as insignificant. Proceding, then, to the attraction of the earth, that is, the weight of the shell, we know that this weight will diminish in the inverse ratio of the square of the distance. When a body left to itself falls to the surface of the earth, it falls five feet in the first second; and if the same body were removed 257,542 miles further off, in other words, to the distance of the moon, its fall would be reduced to about half a line in the first second. That is almost equivalent to a state of perfect rest.
Baton Turbo Regular, 18px, alternate g
It is generally asserted that gunpowder was invented in the fourteenth century by the monk Schwartz, who paid for his grand discovery with his life. It is, however, pretty well proved that this story ought to be ranked among the legends of the middle ages. Gunpowder was not invented by any one; it was the lineal successor of the Greek fire, which, like itself, was composed of sulfur and saltpeter. Few persons are acquainted with the mechanical power of gunpowder. Now this is precisely what is necessary to be understood in order to comprehend the importance of the question submitted to the committee. A litre of gunpowder weighs about two pounds; during combustion it produces 400 litres of gas. This gas, on being liberated and acted upon by temperature raised to 2,400 degrees, occupies a space of 4,000 litres: consequently the volume of powder is to the volume of gas produced by its combustion as 1 to 4,000. One may judge, therefore, of the tremendous pressure on this gas when compressed within a space 4,000 times too confined. All this was, of course, well known to the members of the committee when they met on the following evening.
Baton Turbo Book, 18px
Features
Baton Turbo is based on Baton, a condensed typeface we created for the redesign of french GQ magazine. The proportions of Baton Turbo were adapted to create a practical typeface that would work well in text. Some parts of the design were also revisited. Wider shapes, a bigger x-height, and less extreme features, make Baton Turbo very readable in small sizes, while giving it a contemporary look.

Baton Turbo includes a wide range of OpenType features and alternate letters, a selection of which can be seen below. Check the PDF specimen for the complete list of features.

In the upright styles, Stylistic Sets provide alternates for the letters a, g and j.
With their simple shapes, these can prove useful and bring a different look.

In the italic styles, Stylistic Set 6 activates alternate letter f descending under the baseline, creating a more livingful feel. All f-ligatures are covered.

Stylistic Set 1 activates capitals with short accents, for tight leading in settings where capitals are set on more than one line, such as magazine covers or posters.

Traditional oldstyle figures dance at different heights. We felt these would be too mannered for the straightforward style of Baton Turbo. Instead, the oldstyle feature activates smaller and lighter figures that integrate better in text. Tabular figures are also available for all styles.

Automatic fractions, replacing figures separated by a slash, are included and can be activated with the fraction – “frac” in CSS – opentype feature.
Overview
Baton Turbo Regular
Baton Turbo Book
Baton Turbo Medium
Baton Turbo Bold
Baton Turbo Heavy
Regular Italic
Book Italic
Medium Italic
Bold Italic
Heavy Italic
ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
0123456789
ÀÁÂÃÄÅÆĀĂĄǺǼÇĆĈĊČĎĐÈÉÊËĒĔĖĘĚ
ĜĞĠĢĤĦIJÎÌÏÍĮĨĪIĬĴĶĹĻĽĿŁŃŅŇÑŊ
ÒÓÔÕÖØŌŎŐǾŒŔŖŘŜŞŠȘŚŤȚŦ
ÙÚÛÜŨŪŬŮŰŲŴẀẂẄÝŸŶỲŹŻŽÐÞ
àáâãäåæāăąǻǽçćĉċčďđèéêëēĕėęě
ĝğġģĥħijîìïíįĩīiĭĵķĸĺļľŀłńņňñŋ
òóôõöøōŏőǿœŕŗřŝşšșśťțŧ
ùúûüũūŭůűųŵẁẃẅýÿŷỳźżžðþ
abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz
¼½¾ 01234567890123456789
¿?¡!.,:;…‘’‚“”„'"‹›«»\/ ⁄ {}()[]|¦·•-–—_
&@#¢£¥€$ƒ©®™ªº§¶†‡*℮
%‰+±−×÷=≠<>~≈^

Language support:

Afrikaans, Albanian, Asu, Basque, Bemba, Bena, Bosnian, Breton, Catalan, Cornish, Croatian (latin), Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, Esperanto, Estonian, Faroese, Filipino, Finnish, French, Gaelic, Galician, German, Greenlandic, Hungarian, Icelandic, Indonesian, Irish, Italian, Latin, Latvian, Lithuanian, Maltese, Maori, Moldavian, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Romanian, Rumantsch, Saami, Serbian (latin), Slovak, Slovenian, Spanish, Swahili, Swedish, Turkish, Welsh, Wolof, Zulu.

Desktop + Web license with unlimited traffic
Available exclusively at Fatype.com
© 2016 Fatype, Yassin Baggar & Anton Koovit

Purchase
Free trials